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Posts for: November, 2013

By Edward C. Smith, DMD, MPH, LLC
November 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Top5TipsforTeethingTots

If your infant is extra cranky and seems to want to chew everything in sight, it's a good bet that the first tooth is on the way! For parents, this is cause for both celebration and concern. After all, no parent wants to see a child suffer even a little bit. Decades ago, when a teething infant showed signs of discomfort, a parent might have rubbed some whisky or other strong liquor on the child's gums — a misguided and dangerous practice. There are far safer, more effective ways to help your child through this exciting yet sometimes uncomfortable phase of development. Here are our top five teething remedies:

Chilled rubber teething rings or pacifiers. Cold can be very soothing, but be careful not to freeze teething rings or pacifiers; ice can actually burn the sensitive tissues of the mouth if left in place too long.

Cold, wet washcloths. These are great for gnawing on. Make sure the washcloth is clean and that you leave part of it dry to make it more comfortable to hold.

Cold foods. When your child is old enough, cold foods such as popsicles may soothe sore gums. However, make sure you confine them to mealtimes because sugars can cause tooth decay — even in very young children.

Gum massage. Massaging inflamed gums with your clean finger can help counteract the pressure from an erupting tooth.

Over-the-counter medicine. If teething pain persists, you can give your baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen, but check with a pharmacist or this office for the correct dosage. The medicine should be swallowed and not massaged into the sore areas, as this, too, can burn.

So when does it all begin? Some babies start teething as early as three months or as late as twelve months, but the typical time frame is between six and nine months. Usually the two lower front teeth erupt first, followed by the two upper front teeth. The first molars come in next, followed by the canines (eyeteeth). Most children have all 20 of their baby teeth by age 3.

If you have any questions about teething or the development of your child's teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”


By Edward C. Smith, DMD, MPH, LLC
November 25, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers   Columbus  
Cosmetic Dentist Columbus GA VeneersIf you smile doesn’t live up to what you desire, talk to Dr. Edward Smith, our dentist serving Columbus, for proper diagnosis and treatment planning with dental veneers. Whether your teeth are chipped, discolored, worn down or crooked, veneers can be used to mask your dental blemishes. 
 
Dental veneers are special thin laminates that are a form of cosmetic dentistry, and also work to protect the surface of your damaged teeth, which can even eliminate the need for more extensive treatments.  Other benefits of veneers include:
 
  • Durability
  • Improved smile appearance
  • Little-to-no removal of tooth structure
 
It is important to understand that the removal of any natural tooth structure is permanent, which makes your decision to undergo treatment in Columbus with veneers important. As a Columbus dentist, Dr. Smith prefers to offer patients the most minimally invasive options first before choosing veneers.  If your natural teeth are functionally and esthetically adequate, dental veneers may not be an appropriate treatment for you.  However, if your teeth are severely discolored, then your treatment options may include porcelain veneers or composite veneers. 
 

Caring for Your Veneers

 
After your veneer procedure, it is important to practice proper care in order to help your veneers last as long as possible.  Care must be taken to not abuse your veneers because the thin porcelain shells or composite layers can be damaged or broken. Dr. Edward Smith will also advise you against certain uses or dietary tendencies, such as eating carrots or chewing on ice, and may recommend that you wear a protective appliance while you are sleeping if you grind your teeth. 
 
If you are interested in significantly altering the appearance of your smile, and teeth whitening has not worked, talk to Dr. Edward Smith, Columbus cosmetic dentist, for further diagnosis and to find out if veneers are an appropriate treatment for your smile. 

By Edward C. Smith, DMD, MPH, LLC
November 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
GiulianaRancicPreparesforHerSonsFirstDentalVisit

When Giuliana Rancic, long-time host of E! News, first saw her new son, she said it was “the best single moment of my life.” Recently, on the eve of Duke's first birthday, the TV personality and reality star spoke to Dear Doctor magazine about her growing family, her battle with cancer — and the importance of starting her child off with good oral health.

“Duke will have his first visit with the dentist very soon, and since he is still a baby, we will make his visit as comfortable as possible,” Giuliana said. That's a good thought — as is the timing of her son's office visit. Her husband Bill (co-star of the couple's Style Network show) agrees. “I think the earlier you can start the checkups, the better,” he said.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry concurs. In order to prevent dental problems, the AAPD states, your child should see a dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his or her first birthday. But since a child will lose the primary (baby) teeth anyway, is this visit really so important?

“Baby” Teeth Have a Vital Role
An age one dental visit is very important because primary teeth have several important roles: Kids rely on them for proper nutrition and speech, and don't usually begin losing them until around age 6. And since they aren't completely gone until around age 12, kids will depend on those “baby teeth” through much of childhood. Plus, they serve as guides for the proper position of the permanent teeth, and are vital to their health. That's why it's so important to care for them properly.

One major goal for the age one dental visit is to identify potential dental issues and prevent them from becoming serious problems. For example, your child will be examined for early signs of dental diseases, including baby bottle tooth decay which is a major cause of early childhood caries. Controlling these problems early can help youngsters start on the road to a lifetime of good oral health.

Besides screening your child for a number of other dental conditions or developmental problems, and assessing his or her risk for cavities, the age one visit also gives you the opportunity to ask any questions you may have about dental health in these early years. Plus, you can learn the best techniques for effectively cleaning baby's mouth and maintaining peak oral hygiene.

Breezing Through the Age-One Visit
To ease your child's way through his or her first dental visit, it helps if you're calm yourself. Try to relax, allow plenty of time, and bring along lots of activities — some favorite toys, games or stuffed animals will add to everyone's comfort level. A healthy snack, drink, and spare diapers (of course) won't go unappreciated.

“We'll probably bring some toys and snacks as reinforcements,” said Giuliana of her son's upcoming visit. So take a tip from the Rancics: The age one dental visit is a great way to start your child off right.

If you would like more information on pediatric dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”